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Passive smoking and breast cancer

Passive smoking and breast cancer

Experts from the American Agency for Environmental Protection have released, for the first time, the largest report establishing a link between breast cancer and passive smoking.

Experts from the American Agency for Environmental Protection have released, for the first time, the largest report establishing a link between breast cancer and passive smoking.
The report by American researchers totals 1,200 pages and is based on more than 1,000 studies on the effects of passive smoking. There are various health problems caused by tobacco, in particular respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and several forms of cancer. The report also states for the first time that passive smoking can lead to breast cancer.
Experts have concluded that women exposed to cigarette smoke are 90% more likely to develop breast cancer compared to women who do not smoke and do not live near smokers.

US agency spokesman Allan Hirsch said that passive smoking has negative effects especially for premenopausal women.
The report has been reviewed for several months and will be approved today by several specialists from around the world. If they will agree with the results of this research, it is possible to propose the adoption of much more drastic antitrust legislation. Dr. Terry Pechacek of the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta (CDC Atlanta) believes that this report will trigger broad national debates. He also believes that scientific evaluation of smoking and breast cancer should be continued.
Dr. Tooyuki Hanaoka, from the National Cancer Center in Tokyo, published a study in the International Journal of Cancer on the effects of cigarettes on women.
Together with other colleagues, Dr. Hanaoka observed, in 1990, more than 21,800 women between the ages of 40 and 59. In 1999, the researchers diagnosed 180 breast cancer cases. 69% of women with cancer were smokers or were regularly exposed to cigarette smoke.
Thus, Dr. Hanaoka concluded that the risk of breast cancer is four times higher in premenopausal women.
Dr Tooyuki Hanaoka claims that, after menopause, cigarettes do not increase the risk of cancer. To explain this difference between menopausal and other women, the researchers say it's because of the hormones. A high level of estrogen hormones multiplies the adverse effects of smoking.
Source: National Journal